News: summer exhibition

Join us in Cambridge this summer for an exhibition of Michael’s work, hosted by Cambridge Book & Print Gallery.

Email: enquiries@cambridgeprints.com. Telephone/Facsimile: (44) + 1223 694264.

Save the dates!

17-30 June 2016 Cambridge Book & Print Gallery, 49, Newnham Road, Cambridge CB3 9EY.

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Picture post 14: Study for The Third Man

MR 60 Study for The Third Man, acrylic on card, 315x410, 1990s

Cinema was enormously important to Michael’s work. As a child he had seen films at the local cinema in Portswood, Southampton, initially with his mum and grandma, then later with a bunch of friends. As a painter, he loved to look through a camera viewfinder at a potential subject for a painting; the framing makes subtle changes to the brain’s perception of what the eye sees. Continue reading “Picture post 14: Study for The Third Man”

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Picture post 13: flowering Apple Tree

MR 48 Apple tree, oil on canvas, 340 x 315, 1981.

One of Michael’s early influences was Vincent Van Gogh, which is clear in this small painting of a flowering apple tree in the family garden in Cambridgeshire. He had recently visited the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and was working through some ideas gleaned from the trip. The paint is thickly applied on the canvas and the colours sing through the layers, reflecting the layers of  blossom on a tree. Michael preferred to paint from life at this point, he didn’t use photographs as a reference until much later, so this painting really captures a moment in time.

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Picturepost 12: Cousins

MR  115, Cousins, acrylic on card, 270x345, 1998 resized

Cousins records a family day out at the beach. Michael’s in-laws lived in Dorset so it was the natural location for family holidays, especially as the sea was so easily accessible. He loved this particular beach; not only did it provide days of entertainment for three lively children, it also inspired numerous sketches, photographs and paintings.

NEW: This painting is also available to buy as a limited edition print from a giclee scan and mounted on museum board. The print costs £125 including p&p. Email info@michaelrandallfineart.co.uk for further details.

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Picturepost 11: Soho Hairdresser

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MR 78 Soho hairdresser, acrylic on card, 235×165, 1990.

One damp and cold winter’s evening on a family visit to London, Michael’s attention was captured by the lights, colours and activity in a hairdresser’s shop in Soho. He stood outside the door, sketching with oil pastels until he had enough information on the page, but not before his three small children had loudly stated their utter boredom with waiting for him to finish. The black panel on the right side indicates his constant testing the boundaries of composition and also prefigures his experiments with dense blocks of colour that we’ve seen in Picturepost 1 (Closed Visits) and Picturepost 3 (Grantchester Meadows).

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Picturepost 10: Study for ‘Poll Tax Riots’

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MR 58 Study for Poll Tax Riots, acrylic on card, 345×515, 1991

The Poll Tax Riots exploded onto British streets in March 1990 in response to the introduction that year of the Community Charge. The widespread newspaper coverage provided plenty of images for Michael to begin a series of works, which culminated in a large oil painting of a rioting crowd, which will be the subject of a future post. This b/w gouache sketch captures the intense anger many people felt about the imposition of what came to be called the poll tax. He was naturally attracted to the challenge of conveying emotion and energy in his work; sometimes the atmosphere would be calm and quiet but with events like this he was inspired by the energy that drove the action. He always tried to remain apolitical, but actually he was strongly against the policies of Margaret Thatcher’s government, believing that the existence of the working class was threatened by their policies.

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Picturepost 9: NSW Rockpool

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Michael travelled to Australia in the mid-70s staying with friends in New South Wales and Western Australia  and, as you can imagine, he recorded as much as he could on paper and board, rather than with a camera. The light and colours in the landscape inspired a series of paintings of which this is perhaps the most complete. In Australia he felt that he was looking at the world with new eyes and his already strong sense of colour was developed significantly during and after that trip. This rockpool was close to a friend’s farm that lay 20 miles up a dirt track and with the neighbours five miles away. He was enchanted by the light reflecting on the surface of the water, and by the lizards that stalked through the grass, looking for a tasty lunch of snake.